Skip to content

Posts tagged ‘organic’

A Vegetarian’s Guide to Bodrum, Turkey

Vegetarian Mezzes in Bitez @ Bodrum’un Mezecisi

Bodrum is delicious, health-trendy not! If you are into the vegan lifestyle or organic raw or gluten-free diet, Bodrum can’t deliver. We spent two months searching for places that can provide clean health-food but alas, we didn’t have many breakthroughs. Below are reviews of the only two mainly-vegetarian restaurants on the Bodrum peninsula.

KISMET LOKANTASI

Atatürk Bulvarı No: 35 / A Konacık Bodrum, Turkey (Behind Finansbank)
+90 252 319 0096        Hours: 11am-4pm

Open only for lunch, Kismet Lokantasi is the first Slow Food restaurant on the Aegean. Located on a side street in Konacik, a town right outside of the Bodrum harbor, Kismet Lokantasi offers an array of Turkish/Aegean vegetarian dishes.

The restaurant is set up with a collective feel of a canteen– patrons must gesture to the manager what dishes they want from the glass counter. After the manager has written down the order, one must find a place to sit among the communal tables. There is both indoor and outdoor seating. Miraculously, the food arrives at one’s table within minutes — even though the  manager doesn’t give out numbers or take a name!

tomato and eggplant mussaka, shepard salad, chickpea mash, hummus, yoghurt with mint, quinoa bell pepper salad

The scrumptious healthy home-cooked meal is served on small white plates in order for everyone in your party to share and get in on all the flavors. The manager, the waiters and the cashier are all very helpful and rich in smiles. Prices are extremely fair thanks to the fact that this lokontasi (casual restaurant) is only known by locals; in fact, each time we dined here, we were the only foreigners.
Tip: Either get here before noon or after 2:30pm as it gets very busy! Be aware that some of the dishes may already be sold out if you get here in the late afternoon.

Dont Forget! Kismet Lokantasi only serves lunch!

BODRUM’UN MEZECISI

Atatürk Bulvarı No: 35/C Bitez
Bitez, Bodrum, Muğla (Down the street from the famous Bitez Dondurma)
+90 252 363 9500

Tired of eating at restaurants? Head to Bitez to pick up great vegetarian take-out. Like Kismet Lokantasi, Bodrum’un Mezecisi is also part of the slow food movement but rather than serving Aegean dishes, this mezze-deli specializes in Ottoman cuisine. They offer 30 cold mezze dishes daily and one hot dish after 2pm  (at the moment, it’s spinach fritters).  Dishes are priced by weight so you can get exactly as much as you want.

Yes, you can dine-in at this mezze-deli but they prefer if you take out. 

On the plate: Hummus, green beans in olive oil, spicy yoghurt, chinese cabbage, walnut mash

On the plate: Hummus, green beans in olive oil, spicy yoghurt, chinese cabbage, walnut mash

 

Advertisements

A guide to Organic Health Food stores in Beirut

While some may feel “home” in bookstores, at the hairdresser or whilst playing a video game, my comfort place is rather niche: any health food store. I grew up in Marin, a suburb of bohemian San Francisco, where I was never far from kamut bagels, almond milk (soy milk was the trend in the 90s but now it’s almond), quinoa salads and superfoods (ex. Chia, collard greens, wheatgrass) etc. And so now, when travelling, I try to find health food stores wherever I may be.

Below is a reviewed list of stores in Beirut which pride themselves on their organic and biodynamic certifications.

Note: I would recommend using Google maps for exact locations.

 

Al Marej Organic Food Store 

Fresh goat cheese from Al Marej

Fresh goat cheese from Al Marej

Abdul Wahab El Inglizi Street, Achrafiyeh, Beirut

01 210 211

https://www.facebook.com/AlMarejOrganicFood/

 

Al Marej offers everything from organic halal meat, dairy products, fresh veggies, jams, vinegars, healthy snacks, olive oil to essential oils and organic body

Al Marej Farm in Laklouk, Lebanon

Al Marej Farm in Laklouk, Lebanon

products (of which 85% are from their own certified organic farm). Although the store may not appear as full as others, their products are the most authentic, tasty and fresh. Everything I have bought there has been “the best of the best” (i.e. I have tried at least 10 olive oils in Lebanon, the one they sell is the richest most delicious). When I asked the elderly owner how he first got introduced to organics, he smiled and said: “I have always been a farmer!” Yes, there was a time when the term “organic” wasn’t necessary, one was just a farmer. Sigh.

Al Marej offers daily and weekly delivery of their produce.

 

 

A New Earth

Zahrat Ihsan, Achrafieh, Beirut

01 219 920

 

A fairly big store with a wide selection of imported goods. Fresh produce selection is not impressive, nor is the staff, but they may have what you need if you are looking for something particular. Note: This health food store is quite tricky to find so I would recommend saving their phone number and bringing a Smartphone (Google maps!)

 

BiolandScreen Shot 2014-08-28 at 12.08.30 PM

Sioufi, Achrafieh

+961 1 398111

http://bioland-lb.com/contact.php

 

Bioland is a very clean store that offers fresh produce from their farms in the north of Lebanon, including dairy, meat and jams. The store also sells packaged imported goods like Chia seeds. I was most excited to see fresh bags of kale! I have been looking everywhere for kale and Bioland has a bountiful supply. However, while their banana jam was quite tasty, the dairy products from their farms were inedible and had to be thrown out (the cheese had gone bad) and the yoghurt was not good at all. They offer a daily specialty dish, which is very clean and tasty, and a good option if one is tired of fat-filled too-many-ingredient dishes present at most restaurants.

 

CarrafourIMG_5701

Beirut City Center

Hazmieh

This mega-market has a fairly decent selection of organic Biomass produce. Cucumbers and tomatoes can be quite tasty if you are lucky enough to go to the store on the days they get their deliveries.

 

Beirut Bio CenterScreen Shot 2014-08-28 at 12.10.15 PM

Hazmieh, next to Yuppie Park and City Centre

03788613

http://www.beirutbiocenter.com/

 

A place for *macrobiotic lovers, Bio Center is hosted in a run down monastery-like house. They have a VERY small selection of imported products and no fresh produce for sale. So what exactly is the Bio Center? It’s a macrobiotic restaurant that serves a selection of daily dishes (all very heavy in grains and rice!).

On a personal note, the “Center”, located on the side of the highway, felt like a creepy commune. The brick entry path was breaking off and as soon as I walked through the metal doors I wanted to turn to leave. Once inside, I was met with no friendly welcome; the owner was nowhere in sight and the grounds were deserted except for a scruffy man sitting in the corner of the room eating silently.

 

*Macrobiotic:  a dietary regimen which involves eating grains as a staple food, supplemented with other foods such as local vegetable, and avoiding the use of highly processed or refined foods and most animal products (Wikipedia).

 

Souk Al Tayeb

Every Saturday from 9-2 at Beirut Souks

 

Don’t have high expectations when you go to Beirut’s only farmers market. While at first glance it may seem impressive, variety is limited and some of the produce appears artificial (see: rose water, jams etc.) Maybe it’s the markets’ setting (an extremely ritzy mall in downtown Beirut), but the whole affair appears to be a circus for tourists and expats living in the city. Saying that, you can find some gems; local eggs, fresh stevia, organic body soaps and what my mother can’t seem to find anywhere else: barley tea from Egypt. Check it out for yourselves and see what you think, just don’t buy their kishik! (powder made from goat and cows milk mixed with bulgur wheat).

 

 

Under Objective Eyes

One of the best things about being around someone that is not family, not of “the same cloth,” is that, if you allow yourself, this person enables you to see your surroundings objectively under new light.

While, for some, it may be painful to see their backyard in reveal, for me, the experience has been one of relief and clarity — my intuition has finally received some sort of back up support!

Now, to the meat (Certified Organic, of course): Every city, neighborhood or house has it’s own culture, unique norms and social constructs. The core of any such assemblage is created by the gradual solidification of a specific belief, often to the effect of the eventual exclusion of others. As of right now, my surroundings largely consist of liberal, highly educated, highly-travelled and well-off individuals.  And put simply, this group of people seem to have bought into the lure of the meme of Organic. To exemplify the extent to which an idea can take over unassumingly, I am going to talk about the community of Organic followers.

The idea of Organic has, in the last few years, become so common—thus so watered down, that it has lost its true meaning. It has been spun by the “socially conscious” into a belief, without them even realizing they are doing so.

I cannot tell you how many times the word, in its noun and adjective forms, comes up in conversation, most often when the topic is not even food. At a recent conference I attended, the word got dropped in almost all of the plenary sessions presented, and let me mention: this was a conference on IMPACT INVESTING!

How many times have I seen my own mother pick up health products, energy drinks, vitamins, oils and supplements JUST BECAUSE they are labeled Organic? Each week a new item comes up, organic garments are woven, new soaps are created and thus she feels, like many others in her community, that she must buy every new thing with that Organic CCOF label.  I have seen how, as the product is replaced by another Organic product, she too will buy that one, use it for a few months and then move onto the next Organic fad.

While buying and “living Organic” is not the worst agenda a group can have, it has made me realize how easily subconscious waves can be spread without ever being seen or processed as such by the entity in focus.

It is fascinating to see hypotheses regurgitated over and over again in this pin pointed group, and to see how do’s become norms and norms because absolutes. And as consolidation of an idea occurs, the confidence in that label morphs into the shunning of those who do not comply with the “rules.”

I agree that health is important, nutrition and exercise are key but, pouring Vanilla CoffeeMate creamer into my guest’s hot mug, instead of the Organic alternative, is not going to kill; it will just shave off a bit of the majority’s untouchability so coveted.

%d bloggers like this: